Defining (global) public health and its challenges

19th century remedies

Creative Commons license via Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/aussiegall/309391023/

 

 

An outfit called “Thought Economics: Interviews With the World’s Leading Thinkers” recently posted an interview with some leading members of the public health enterprise: Dr. Julio Frenk (Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, and former Minister of Health of Mexico), Sir Richard Thompson (President of the U.K. Royal College of Physicians), Baron Peter Piot (Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and Dame Sally Davies (The United Kingdom’s Chief Medical Officer).

The questions were, at times very broad (e.g., what is public health; to what extent should health be considered a human right?).  In other cases, the questions were almost predictable (e.g., What are the key challenges and opportunities in the sphere of communicable disease?).

All very useful for a very high level overview of the challenges facing contemporary public health.  Of particular interest was Peter Piot’s answer to the question, “what is global health?”.  His pithy answer was interesting:

Many of our health problems challenges cannot be solved within one specific border. In the old days, we had ‘tropical medicine’ which was a colonial approach. This led to international-health during the cold-wars which simply meant the health of those far away. Now we have the concept of ‘global health’ which reflects the globalisation of the world.

global health

Source: BMC Medicine

Alas, I think that too much of what is written under the rubric of global health remains in the style of “the health of those far away”. There are good and bad reasons for this.  On the one hand, there is just the continuing interest in investigating the health of people in other countries.  On the other hand, what is perhaps new in the last 10-15 years is an acceleration of research that is written from a more normative perspective.  On this account, we need to be concerned about the health of those far away because all too often their health status is very poor indeed and this is, quite simply, unacceptable.

Perhaps this is simply an expression of life in a globalized world.  We are very much connected one to the other, not just by the speed at which infectious disease can travel, but also by the fact that we have a shared humanity and it is unacceptable to turn a blind eye to the plight of others.  And of course, in a globalised world what we do in our own backyard can have such a large effect on the health of people in far away places.  The migration of highly skilled health professionals is but one example of this.

All of this may be self-evident to specialists in global health but for a more lay audience, these distinctions are interesting and important.

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